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Superior Semicircular Canal Dehiscence Syndrome


What is superior semicircular canal dehiscence syndrome?

Superior semicircular canal dehiscence syndrome (or SSCDS) is a condition where the normal bony covering of the superior semicircular canal (one of the three balance canals that respond to angular acceleration) is missing.

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What type of symptoms do patients with SSCDS have?
Many, but not all, patients with SSCDS have dizziness. This dizziness may be brought on by loud noises, such as the clanging of dishes together, or by pressure changes, such as sneezing, coughing, or straining. Some patients report hearing their heartbeat in the affected ear and often complain of ear fullness. Many patients describe that their voice sounds louder in one particular ear as well. Other less common symptoms include hearing one’s own eye movements and hearing one’s own footsteps on certain surfaces (watch this video: Inside Todd’s Head).

What causes SSCDS?
Currently the exact cause of SSCDS is not known. It is likely that some individuals are predisposed to the thinning of bone in certain areas of the skull base, leading to problems such as SSCDS. Additionally, head trauma may play a role in certain cases of SSCDS. Not all individuals with a dehiscence of the superior semicircular canal (as might be seen on a special CAT scan and verified by certain tests) actually have symptoms.

How is SSCDS treated?
SSCDS treatment must be individualized to each particular patient. While there is no specific medical therapy for SSCDS, various surgical management options are available.

Disclaimer:
The information and reference materials included on this website are intended solely for the general information and education purposes of the reader. They are not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice or to diagnose health problems. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to discuss the information presented here.

Congratulations Dr. Judy Nelson!

Judy Nelson, one of our physician assistants, has been a member of the Jacksonville Hearing and Balance Institute team since 2003. Her care and compassion is well-known by her patients. We are very proud to say that in addition to having more than 36 years of experience, she has recently completed her Doctor of Medical Science degree through the University of Lynchburg, with a specialty in Neurotology.  

Congratulations Judy Nelson, DMSc, PA-C!

Judy Nelson, MPAS, PA-C

Dr. Nelson works with patients with dizziness, vertigo, imbalance and hearing loss. If you would like to schedule an appointment, please call us at 904-399-0350.

Congratulations Dr. Donna J. Smith!

Donna Smith, one of our physician assistants, has been a member of the Jacksonville Hearing and Balance Institute team since 2015. In addition to having 37 years of experience, she has recently completed her Doctor of Medical Science degree through the University of Lynchburg, with a specialty in Neurotology.  Congratulations Donna J. Smith, DMSc, PA-C!

Dr. Smith works with patients with hearing loss, ear infections, dizziness, vertigo and imbalance. If you would like to schedule an appointment, please call us at 904-399-0350.

BALANCE AWARENESS WEEK

Jacksonville Hearing and Balance Institute would like to recognize Balance Awareness Week—September 15–21, 2019.

The Vestibular Disorders Association (VeDA) created Balance Awareness Week in 1997. The idea is to shine a light on the millions of Americans who suffer from imbalance and dizziness. It can often be difficult to live a “normal” life when you are constantly off-balance or fearing when your next dizzy episode may occur.

If you answer “yes” to any or all of the below questions, you may need to come in and be evaluated at our clinic.

  1. Because of your problem, do you feel frustrated?
  2. Does your problem significantly restrict your participation in social activities, such as going out to dinner, going to movies, dancing or to parties?
  3. Because of your problem, have you been embarrassed in front of others?
  4. Because of your problem, do you feel handicapped?
  5. Does your problem interfere with your job or household responsibilities?

For an appointment, call 904-399-0350.

The Connection between Hearing and Balance

Why Test My Hearing If I Have Vertigo?

As our name suggests, Jacksonville Hearing and Balance Institute helps patients with hearing and balance/dizziness issues. But how are hearing loss and dizziness related? If you have scheduled an appointment because of your dizziness, why would you need to have your hearing evaluated?

The answer to the above questions lies within the anatomy of our inner ear. The hearing and balance organs are both housed in the inner ear. The cochlea is necessary for hearing and the semicircular canals are part of our balance system.

There are multiple disorders that can cause disruptions in our hearing and balance. The type and configuration of hearing loss can help our providers better diagnose your dizziness. Meniere’s disease is one example of a disorder that is defined by the dizziness you are experiencing and the type of hearing loss that you may have. A patient with Meniere’s disease can experience dizziness for 30 minutes to multiple hours and have fluctuations in their hearing accompanied by a roaring tinnitus. Semi-circular Canal Dehiscence is another disorder that can be accompanied with hearing loss. A patient with SCCD may have a slight conductive component present on the audiogram even though they may not perceive a hearing deficit.

Jacksonville Hearing and Balance provides a comprehensive evaluation to help diagnose and treat your hearing loss and/or dizziness. For questions or to schedule an evaluation, you can reach us at (904)351-1904.