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Bone Anchored Hearing Devices

While hearing aids and cochlear implants are better known options for assisting those with hearing impairments, there is another device that may be more appropriate for your hearing loss. A BAHD, also known as a bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA), is made up of a surgically implanted portion and a removable external processor. These devices are unique in that they send signals to your inner ear via vibrations. These vibrations are interpreted by your inner ear the same as any other sound signal.

As you can see in the above below, the sound processor sits just behind the ear.

 

Who is a candidate for the bone-anchored hearing device?

Patients with middle ear issues (chronic ear infections, previous surgeries, etc.) are often successful users of a BAHD because it bypasses the middle ear and directly stimulates the inner ear. The device is also beneficial for those with single-sided deafness. The BAHD is placed on the side of the head with the severe-to-profound hearing loss and the signal is sent to the better hearing ear.

New options with the BAHD!

Previously, the BAHD could only be worn by attaching it to an abutment that projected out from under the skin or by wearing a headband. There is now an option for attaching the external processor to the internal implant via a magnet. The image on the left demonstrates the magnet attachment.

 

In addition to the new wearing options, BAHDs have Bluetooth capabilities!

 

If you and your family are interested in learning more about BAHDs and want to know if you are a possible candidate, please do not hesitate to contact our clinic at 904-399-0350.

Enjoying the Summer Weather with Your Cochlear Implant

If you or a loved one has a cochlear implant there is no need to miss out on the joys of enjoying time with friends or family in the pool or at the beach. Each cochlear implant company offers a solution to enjoy conversation around water.

 

• Cochlear:
o For their on-the-ear style processors (N6 and N7)Cochlear offers the Aqua Kit which includes a waterproof case and cable/coil. A clip is also available to attach the waterproof case to a ponytail, bathing suit or T-shirt for worry free swimming.
o The off-the-ear style offers the Kanso Activity Kit which includes a waterproof case that can be held in place with a sweat band or with goggles.

 

• Advanced Bionics:

o The Naida processor offers a waterproof case and cable/headpiece that can be clipped to a bathing suit, T-shirt or even your swim trunks thanks to a range of cable lengths.
o The Neptune processor is a fully waterproof processor that needs no extra case or cover. The Neptune can be clipped to a T-shirt, goggles or bathing suit.

 

• Med El:
o The on-the ear Sonnet processor kit includes a waterproof sleeve and adhesive system to allow the processor to become fully waterproof.
o The Rondo is an off-the-ear processor that is also available with a sleeve that can be held in place with a clip for added safety.

 

When using a waterproof solution be sure to use a rechargeable or alkaline battery rather than the 675 Zinc Air cochlear implant battery. It I also recommended that after you remove your processor from the waterproof case to place the equipment in the dry-kit. Waterproof devices can be included in your initial cochlear implant kit or are available for purchase out of pocket.
If you would like more information regarding whether a cochlear implant is an appropriate treatment option for your hearing loss contact Jacksonville Hearing and Balance Institute at 904-399-0350 to discuss your options.

Frequency Asked Questions about Lithium-Ion Batteries in Hearing Aids

Frequency Asked Questions about Lithium-Ion Batteries in Hearing Aids

  • Is a lithium-ion battery safe in hearing aids?

Lithium-ion is the popular rechargeable battery choice used in many everyday consumer electronics such as cellular phones and tablets. It is also the rechargeable solution for cochlear implants. Currently, it is the fastest growing and most promising battery technology and has been thoroughly tested. Note that the hearing aid must be stored within the operating temperature of 33 degs to 104 degs Fahrenheit (0 degs to +40 degs Celsius) to ensure safe conditions.

  • How many hours per day can lithium-ion hearing aids last on a single charge?

This depends on the hearing loss, the power of the receiver, and the amount of streaming. However, this usually ranges from 20 hours to 24 hours.

  • Will the performance of the lithium-ion battery deteriorate after 1 year and require replacing?

No. With the Phonak system, the electronics surrounding the lithium-ion battery have been specially designed so that the battery will last up to 4 years. After 4 years, the performance of the battery may deteriorate slightly, but this should not have a large impact on use.

  • Are lithium-ion hearing aids safe to use during air travel?

Yes. Airline rules state that lithium-ion batteries less than 25 grams may be brought on to the plane in carry-on luggage. Phonak rechargeable hearing aid batteries are less than 1 gram and therefore fall far below the dangerous goods level. Commercial airline regulations do not permit lithium-ion batteries to be placed in checked luggage.

  • How do I dispose of a lithium-ion hearing aid?

Lithium-ion batteries are 100% recyclable and can be used to create new products. If you wish to dispose of the hearing aid, please return it to your audiologist or contact Phonak for more information.

 

 

 

What to Expect From a Cochlear Implant

A cochlear implant can be a life changing treatment for people with severe hearing loss who receive little benefit from hearing aids. An important component of the cochlear implant process is to approach the first several weeks after activation with realistic expectations, commitment and patience. A cochlear implant is designed to bypass the damaged hair cells of the hearing organ, the cochlea, and deliver sounds to the brain by directly stimulating the auditory nerve. The brain then interprets the sound as a meaningful message. This mechanism is very different than the way our natural hearing system is designed so right away the brain is unable to recognize the sounds delivered by the cochlear implant. The good news is that the brain is an amazing organ and capable of learning new things all the time. The brain will learn to recognize speech and environmental sounds with exposure, experience and practice.

 

Exposure: Once the cochlear implant is activated the brain needs to hear sound in order to begin to learn to adapt. Although conversation will likely sound strange and unclear at first the only way to make progress is to expose yourself to all kinds of sound; conversation, music, environmental sounds…anything!

 

Experience: A key part of cochlear implant process is experience; wearing the cochlear implant all day every day, allows speech and other sounds to become more pleasant and clear. Think of the adjustment to a cochlear implant as being a marathon rather than a sprint.

 

Practice: Finally practice, practice, practice! Similar to completing physical therapy exercises at home following a hip replacement surgery, listening therapy must be completed to teach the brain to listen with a cochlear implant. There are many types of listening exercises that can make practice enjoyable. These can be done on your own or with a partner.

 

Keep in mind everyone progresses at their own pace, have patience with the process and know that the benefits will be worth the journey.

 

Better Hearing and Speech Month

May was designated as the Better Hearing and Speech Month by the American Speech-Language-Hearing  Association (ASHA)  in 1927.  The goals of Better Hearing and Speech month is to bring awareness to hearing and speech deficits, educate the population on how these issues effect the community, and empower individuals to take action if they suspect they have a speech or hearing deficit.

Hearing loss is the third most common health issue in the United States, effecting one in every eight people over the age of 12.  Difficulty communicating with others can lead individuals to be withdrawn, negatively impacting them both socially and emotionally.  The primary goal of an audiologist, when working with these patients, is to provide the tools they need to maintain an active lifestyle and minimize the effect of their hearing loss.  The National Institute of Health (NIH) developed a short questionnaire* to see if you could benefit from having your hearing evaluated by an audiologist.

 

NIH QUESTIONNAIRE:

  1. Do you feel frustrated when talking to members of your family because you have difficulty hearing them?
  2. Do you have difficulty hearing or understanding co-workers, clients, or customers?
  3. Do you feel restricted or limited by a hearing problem?
  4. Do you have difficulty hearing when visiting friends, relatives, or neighbors?
  5. Do you have trouble hearing in the movies or in the theater?
  6. Does a hearing problem cause you to argue with family members?
  7. Do you have trouble hearing the TV or radio at levels that are loud enough for others?
  8. Do you feel that any difficulty with your hearing limits your personal or social life?
  9. Do you have trouble hearing family or friends when you are together in a restaurant?

 

If you answered “YES” to three or more of above questions, feel free to contact our clinic at (904) 339-0350 to schedule an appointment with a provider.  Together you will develop an individualized plan to improve your hearing healthcare.

*Adapted from: Newman, C.W., Weinstein, B.E., Jacobson, G.P., & Hug, G.A. (1990). The Hearing Handicap Inventory for Adults [HHIA]: Psychometric adequacy and audiometric correlates. Ear Hear, 11, 430-433.

WJCT Tinnitus Speaker Series

Identifying and Treating Tinnitus

Jacksonville Hearing and Balance Institute (JHBI) is excited to partner with WJCT to host a speaker series on Friday, March 23rd, on the diagnosis and management of tinnitus, or ringing in the ears.

The event will take place at WJCT studios at 100 Festival Park Ave, Jacksonville FL, 32202. While registration opens at 11:30 am, the main speaking event, which includes a presentation and a question and answer session, will run from 12:00 until 1:00 pm. Complimentary lunch will be provided.

Dr. Douglas Green Jr., the founder of JHBI and the practice’s neurotologist, will be speaking on the medical causes and subsequent diagnosis of tinnitus. Dr. Janelle Kelley, a clinical audiologist at JHBI, will be discussing the audiological evaluation of tinnitus and several management strategies ranging from at-home smart phone app usage to hearing aids.

Space is limited! If you are interested in attending, please RSVP by March 21st at 5pm by calling 904-358-6322 or visiting wjct.org/jhbi.

Kilwins Ice Cream Run

The Hearing Center at Jacksonville Hearing & Balance Join Kilwins Ice Cream Run (5K and One Mile)

The Hearing Center at Jacksonville Hearing & Balance Institute is proud to join Kilwins to be a sponsor of this year’s Kilwins Ice Cream Run (5K and One Mile) to benefit Clarke Schools for Hearing and Speech in Jacksonville. The Clarke mission is to provide children who are deaf or hard of hearing with the listening, learning and spoken language skills they need to succeed. Clarke impacts the lives of children and adults through education and early childhood programs, hearing services, mainstream services, research, curriculum development, and the teachers and professionals trained by Clarke who take their special skills to all parts of the world. They teach children who are deaf and hard of hearing how to listen and talk using the latest technology – all so each person who receives the caring and compassionate services delivered by Clarke is able to reach his or her full potential. The Hearing Center’s audiologists, along with Douglas A. Green Jr., MD and the staff at Jacksonville Hearing & Balance Institute, know Clarke is more than a school, it is a place that allows new horizons for those they serve. Register now and come along with us – run and walk to help this extraordinary organization! Sign up today – and bring your friends: //www.clarkeschools.org/icecreamrun

 

An event to Benefit
Clarke Schools for Hearing and Speech

Saturday, March 3, 2018
St. Johns Town Center, Jacksonville, FL

Cochlear Americas Open House Event

Learning About Cochlear Implants

If you or a loved one has a severe hearing loss and have tried hearing aids without success you may be a candidate for a cochlear implant. A cochlear implant is an implantable device that works together with an externally worn processor to bypass the damaged portion of the inner ear to deliver sound to the brain. Due to damage to the organ of hearing, many people find that hearing aids simply amplify sound and do not provide clarity or understanding.

To learn more about cochlear implants and other implantable devices please join Jacksonville Hearing and Balance Institute as we partner with Cochlear Americas to host an Open House event on Wednesday, March 7th, 2018. Representatives from Cochlear Americas will be available from 8am-3pm to answer questions, discuss candidacy and show models of cochlear implants and other implantable devices. A cochlear implant audiologist from Jacksonville Hearing and Balance Institute will be available from 10-12pm and from 1-3pm to discuss the evaluation and follow up process.

Mark your calendars for this wonderful and informational event. Feel free to drop by at your convenience any time between 8am and 3pm.

Wednesday March, 7th 2018

Sheraton Jacksonville Hotel
10605 Deerwood Park Blvd
Jacksonville, Florida 32256

8am-3pm

To register, or for more information, contact Ralyn Jelus at rjelus@cochlear.com or by telephone/text at (404)695-8612. We hope to see you there!

Tinnitus Seminar

Causes, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Tinnitus

Jacksonville Hearing and Balance Institute will be hosting an informational seminar about the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of tinnitus. Dr. J. Douglas Green and Janelle Kelley Au.D., CCC-A will be speaking. You will also get the chance to hear from individuals who live with tinnitus on a daily basis and the steps they have taken to manage their tinnitus.

Where: Southeast Regional Library, 10599 Deerwood Park Blvd, Room A

When: Saturday, February 3, 2018

Time: 10:30am – 12:30pm

Seating is limited! Please RSVP by contacting Judy Martin by telephone at  (904) 778-2265 or email at hlaa.jax@gmail.com. We look forward to meeting all those in attendance.

The Lifespan of a Hearing Aid

How Long Do Hearing Aids Last?

One of the most common questions we hear during a hearing aid consultation is “how long will these devices last?” It’s a smart question to ask given the investment that is required for a new pair of hearing aids. Many long-term hearing aid users will also start to worry that their devices will fail suddenly, leaving them without sound.

The average hearing aid user will upgrade their technology after 5 to 6 years. Some people will continue to use a hearing aid for 8-10 years, while others will choose to buy new technology after just two years. Let’s take a look at what might affect how long someone uses a hearing aid:

  1. Repairs: Like all electronics, hearing aids are more prone to requiring repairs the older they are. After the initial manufacturer’s warranty expires on the hearing aid (typically at 2 to 3 years), all repairs are out-of-pocket costs. Depending on what has gone wrong, repairs can range from $50 to $300+. In most cases, frequent repairs also mean time spent without the hearing aid, which can be very difficult for people who have grown dependent on their amplification. If repairs become too frequent, a person may opt to put their money towards updated technology. Also keep in mind that eventually, a manufacturer will run out of replacement parts for older models of hearing aids, so it become more difficult to get an 8-10 year old hearing aid repaired.
  2. Updates to technology: Hearing aid technology turns over very quickly. Most manufacturer’s release at least one new product every year, if not more often. It usually takes about five years for someone to notice a significant increase in sound quality and functionality of the hearing aid in order to justify upgrading technology.
  3. Loss/Damage: New hearing aids usually have a loss and damage warranty for 1-3 years. During that time, if you lose a device, the manufacturer will replace it with a new one for a small fee. Outside of the warranty, if you lose the hearing aid, you have to purchase a new one to replace it.
  4. Hearing changes: Most hearing aids can be reprogrammed to fit a large range of hearing levels. In rare instances of severe and sudden hearing deterioration, it is possible that someone would need to purchase a power device, which would be a new hearing aid designed to fit worsening hearing.

 

If you are wondering if newer hearing aids are appropriate for you, or you are noticing increased difficulties hearing, it’s a good idea to visit your audiologist. He or she can make recommendations for improving your current devices or moving forward with purchasing new technology. Remember that this is your journey, so don’t be afraid to ask questions and state your preferences. We look forward to helping you along the way.