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Hear for the Holidays

Whether you’re holding a family gathering at your house, or attending a get-together with friends and family, the holidays are a great time to reconnect and spend time with people you care about. But when you suffer from hearing loss, the holidays can extra stressful. Don’t let your hearing loss prevent you from enjoying the holidays this year.

Here at JHBI, we are getting ready to celebrate the holidays with better hearing! The Hearing Center is offering a special promotion on hearing aids this holiday season. Enjoy a discount off the cost of hearing aids during the month of December. To take advantage of this offer, call 904-399-0350 to schedule a consolation with an audiologist and learn about the newest technology in hearing aids!

We’re grateful this holiday season – especially to our Veterans

During this holiday season all of us at JHBI and our Hearing Center pause to give thanks to our patients and their families, especially Veterans for their service to protect our freedoms. We’re grateful to all patients for putting their trust in us to help them hear better, especially those with severe hearing loss. 

Also, we thank Clay Today* newspaper for an informative story on our patient, retired Navy Captain Mark Adrick, who had a Cochlear® implant surgically inserted to improve severe hearing loss. After decades of flying helicopters and airplanes, his hearing was completely lost. Most severe hearing loss patients have no idea about the lifelong effects of extended loud noises and how it damages the inner ear’s cochlear nerve and surrounding tissues, sometimes beyond repair. 

As we count our blessings this holiday season, we wish to thank our patients and their families for trusting us to give the best hearing care possible to improve the quality of life. We wish you and your family a healthy and happy holiday season.

https://www.claytodayonline.com/stories/trapped-in-his-own-silence-for-yearsveteran-can-hear-granddaughters-voice,20098

How to Know Which Hearing Aids Are Best For You





There are many different hearing aids available in regards to style and level of technology. Which one is best for you? That answer depends on various factors such as the severity of your hearing loss and what kind of lifestyle you have. It is important to speak with an Audiologist, a licensed hearing healthcare professional, to discuss your particular needs. Four things to consider prior to your appointment with your audiologist are:

1. How technology savvy are you?
Hearing devices today are created with digital technology that allows the audiologist to make specific adjustments for your needs. This technology is also compatible with smartphones & allows hearing aid users to change the volume on their own as well as stream music and phone calls through their hearing devices for better sound quality. Hearing aid users who are not very tech-savvy do not need to worry! The devices can be programmed to function automatically so all you have to do is enjoy hearing better!

2. What kind of environments are you in where you struggle to hear?
Whether you work in a loud environment, have family gatherings with many people or you struggle to hear at the dinner table, your world has some degree of noise. Most hearing aids have noise-reduction technology in them to help alleviate the noise and make those noisy situations more comfortable and let you hear the conversation again. It’s important to speak with your audiologist to determine which degree of noise reduction technology is most suited for your needs.

3. Vanity
The stigma of wearing hearing aids is fading away every day. Just as wearing glasses is normal, so is wearing hearing aids! Yet for those individuals who choose to be more discreet with their hearing needs, they are now made virtually invisible! They are very slim and sit right inside the ear canal & come in a variety of colors to match hair, skin and glasses. They also are available in custom style that sit completely in the ear canal and can’t be seen. It’s important to speak with your audiologist about what you feel comfortable wearing and what is best for your physical needs and hearing loss.

4. Dexterity
Because hearing aids are now smaller than ever, they can be difficult to manipulate if you have certain health conditions such as Parkinson’s disease, arthritis, or other conditions that can cause numbness in the hands. One style may be better for your specific needs than others. Changing the small batteries can be a difficult task if you have dexterity or vision issues. Hearing aids are now rechargeable and do not require fine motor skills to get the hearing aid fully charged again.

The best hearing aids are the ones that work for you! Every persons hearing needs are different, so it is important to see and audiologist to help determine what will work for you.

Adjusting to Hearing Aids

Hearing aids require an adjustment period. This is why most hearing aids come with a trial period. This time allows you to grow accustomed to the hearing aids, as well as make programming adjustments to ease you into the process and maximize the benefit of the devices. There are a few factors that will play a role in the adaptation period including the degree of hearing loss, how long you’ve had the hearing loss, and the effort put into wearing them on a regular basis.

Most hearing loss is a gradual process. In fact, the average person goes about 5 to 7 years before pursuing hearing aids. There are many environmental sounds that haven’t been heard in a long time. For example: birds chirping, traffic and wind noise, paper rustling.

When you are first fit with hearing aids, all of these environmental sounds will be restored to the brain. It can seem overwhelming at first because the brain has forgotten how to handle these sounds. As the brain “re-learns” these sounds, it can better determine what sounds are important and what sounds can be “tuned out”. Your own voice may sound different, too. The longer the devices are worn, the quicker the brain adapts to the new sounds. The most important part of this process is patience.

Exciting Connectivity Options for Cochlear Implants

A cochlear implant is a hearing device that is implanted in the inner ear to help restore volume and clarity of speech. They lead to better communication with friends and family when hearing aids no longer help. Recent advances in technology have even made it possible to listen on a cell phone through a cochlear implant with ease.

Cochlear
The N7 cochlear implant allows users to

  • Connect to iPhone and Android phones to wirelessly stream phone calls and music or videos.
  • Use an app to adjust volume and manipulate settings for better hearing in noisy environments.
  • Connect to the Apple Watch for seamless volume and program adjustments!


Advanced Bionics
The ‘Connect’ is a small receiver coupled to the battery of a Naida Q90 cochlear implant.

  • Connects to any Bluetooth enabled device (iPhone, Android, tablet etc) for easy, hands-free calling.
  • A button on the receiver allows the user to answer and hang up phone calls as well as start and stop music and videos.


Med El
The ‘AudioLink’ connects to the Sonnet and Rondo 2 cochlear implants.

  • Streams phone calls and music or videos from any Bluetooth enabled item.
  • Allows the user to make changes to their volume and programs for enhanced listening in various environments.


Cochlear implants can lead to better speech understanding for people who don’t benefit from hearing aids. Evolving technology allows cochlear implant users to further communicate with friends and family.

For more information regarding whether you are a cochlear implant candidate call JHBI at 904-399-0350.

Noise Induced Hearing Loss and Custom Hearing Protection

Exposure to loud noises is a common cause of hearing loss among the population. Noise induced hearing loss (NIHL) is characterized by a “gradual, progressive loss of high frequency hearing sensitivity that usually presents as a “notch” that occurs at or around 4000 Hz.” For more information on noise induced hearing loss, visit http://american-hearing.org/disorders/noise-induced-hearing-loss/ .

How can you protect your hearing? There are many ways to prevent NIHL, such as:

  • Avoid or limit exposure to dangerously loud sounds
  • Decrease the volume of music systems
  • Move away from loud sound sources when possible
  • If you must be around loud sounds, use appropriate hearing protection
  • What kind of hearing protection devices are available?


At The Hearing Center, we offer a variety of hearing protection devices. Common devices include:

1. Swim plugs are designed to prevent moisture from entering the ear canal during swimming, showering and water sports
2. Shooter’s protection is designed to protect hunters/shooters from impulse noises up to 160 dB peak SPL. These devices can be made with special acoustic filters that allow for awareness of conversation and the ability to track animals. Industrial noise protection- Some work places require workers to wear custom hearing protection due to exposure to dangerous sound levels. Employees who work in industrial factories, construction sites and around aircraft equipment are likely to be required to wear hearing protection. Specialized devices can be made that can connect to radios for those who work in jobs that require radio use.
3. Musician earpieces provide hearing protection for musicians who practice and perform in a variety of settings. Depending on the source and location of the sound, different levels of attenuators can be used in the earpieces to allow for optimal hearing protection.
4. Custom sleep plugs can be used to promote interrupted sleep.
5. Custom fit ear tips for mp3 players or other headphones are designed to have standard earphones fit into a custom fit ear tip. These earplugs help block excessive environmental noise and allow the listener to turn down the music volume.

If you believe you have a noise induced hearing loss, or are at risk of one, make an appointment with your JHBI audiologist to discuss a custom hearing protection option that is suitable for your needs!

BALANCE AWARENESS WEEK

Jacksonville Hearing and Balance Institute would like to recognize Balance Awareness Week—September 15–21, 2019.

The Vestibular Disorders Association (VeDA) created Balance Awareness Week in 1997. The idea is to shine a light on the millions of Americans who suffer from imbalance and dizziness. It can often be difficult to live a “normal” life when you are constantly off-balance or fearing when your next dizzy episode may occur.

If you answer “yes” to any or all of the below questions, you may need to come in and be evaluated at our clinic.

  1. Because of your problem, do you feel frustrated?
  2. Does your problem significantly restrict your participation in social activities, such as going out to dinner, going to movies, dancing or to parties?
  3. Because of your problem, have you been embarrassed in front of others?
  4. Because of your problem, do you feel handicapped?
  5. Does your problem interfere with your job or household responsibilities?

For an appointment, call 904-399-0350.

The Link Between Hearing Loss, Hearing Aids & Cognitive Decline

Annual physicals are a part of all individual’s health routine however, audiological examinations should become part of this routine, particularly as we age. Hearing loss can have a gradual onset and as a result, may go unnoticed for many years. The average timeframe in which someone treats their diagnosed hearing loss is 7 years. The duration of untreated hearing loss is longer for many because it may take years for them to decide to get evaluated. Untreated hearing loss may begin to affect interpersonal relationships and those individuals may withdraw from social interactions and become depressed.

Some warning signs that may indicate an individual may need to have their hearing evaluated are:

* Ringing or buzzing in the ears
* Can hear but not understand others speaking
* Group conversations are difficult
* The TV or radio is louder than normal and others report it is too loud
* They ask others to repeat themselves
* Everyday sounds such as footsteps, humming of the refrigerator or the doorbell are no longer audible

A long term study, “Self-Reported Hearing Loss: Hearing Aids and Cognitive Decline in Edlerly Adults: A 25-year Study,” compared the rate of cognitive decline among older adults who were using hearing aids to those who were not. The outcome found no difference in the rate of cognitive decline between those with no reported hearing loss (the control group) and those who had a hearing loss and were using amplification. However, it was found that those with untreated hearing loss had significantly lower baseline scores on the Mini-Mental State Examination, a well-established test of cognitive function, during the 25-year follow-up period, independent of age, gender and education.

By treating the diagnosed hearing loss with amplification, hearing aid users can experience improved communication with those around them. As a result their moods are improved, they expose themselves to more social interactions and cognitively stimulating activities. This is most likely the underlying reason for the decreased cognitive decline reported in the study.

Untreated hearing loss results in decreased ability to understand speech and increased rate of cognitive decline due to lack of neural stimulation. It is time for a new way of thinking about the importance of hearing care and hearing solutions. Annual audiological evaluations should be conducted to determine the status of individuals hearing and help prevent untreated hearing loss due to lack of diagnosis.

FDA Approves Cochlear Implantation for Single-Sided Deafness

Single-sided deafness (SSD) can create difficulties for people localizing sound and listening in the noisy situations. This can lead to negative impacts on communication and socialization. SSD can be caused by viral infections, head trauma, Meniere’s Disease, or have an unknown cause. Treatment options have been limited, with cochlear implants typically reserved for people with severe to profound hearing loss in both ears.

On July 22, 2019, Med-El USA, a manufacturer of cochlear implants, announced that the Food & Drug administration approved their cochlear implant for people 5 years and older with profound hearing loss in one ear and normal to mild hearing loss in the other. Research supporting the approval shows that SSD participants had improvements in speech understanding in quiet and noise, and improvements in sound localization when they obtained the cochlear implant.

Cochlear implantation still requires certain testing and considerations, but is a step forward for the treatment of single-sided hearing loss.

Hearing with Restaurant Noise

For people with hearing loss, restaurants can be a challenging listening environment when trying to converse with family and loved ones. In a recent article in the Washington Post, Joyce Cohen explains the frustrations often felt by many while eating out. Though it may seem like there is little you could do to improve your ability to hear in challenging listening environments, there are some changes you could make to help limit the effect of background noise.

1. Choose your restaurant carefully.  Modern restaurants often have high ceilings and hard cervices that often reflect noise instead of absorbing it. The more echo and reverberation present, the more difficult it is to understand speech. It is also important to choose a restaurant that has good lightening. Non-verbal cues such as lip reading, facial expressions and body language aid spoken language to help you understand others.

2. Booths are better than tables. The high backs of booths will block some of the environmental sounds that can drown out your conversation. In addition, booth seating is typically made of softer material that can absorb background noise.

3. Sit along the edges of the dining area. By sitting around the perimeter of the room you will avoid having outside noise bombard you from all directions and will allow you to focus on those you want to converse with most.

4. Sit Away from the Kitchen. Kitchens are often the noisiest places in the restaurant. Many open concept kitchens in modern restaurants give off noise pollution to the general sitting area. By choosing a place away from the kitchen, you are able to minimize it’s effect.

For more tips on how to deal with background noise and to learn more about your hearing loss contact Jacksonville Hearing and Balance Institute. Click on the link below to read Joyce Cohen’s article from the Washington Post.