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FDA Approves Cochlear Implantation for Single-Sided Deafness

Single-sided deafness (SSD) can create difficulties for people localizing sound and listening in the noisy situations. This can lead to negative impacts on communication and socialization. SSD can be caused by viral infections, head trauma, Meniere’s Disease, or have an unknown cause. Treatment options have been limited, with cochlear implants typically reserved for people with severe to profound hearing loss in both ears.

On July 22, 2019, Med-El USA, a manufacturer of cochlear implants, announced that the Food & Drug administration approved their cochlear implant for people 5 years and older with profound hearing loss in one ear and normal to mild hearing loss in the other. Research supporting the approval shows that SSD participants had improvements in speech understanding in quiet and noise, and improvements in sound localization when they obtained the cochlear implant.

Cochlear implantation still requires certain testing and considerations, but is a step forward for the treatment of single-sided hearing loss.

Hearing with Restaurant Noise

For people with hearing loss, restaurants can be a challenging listening environment when trying to converse with family and loved ones. In a recent article in the Washington Post, Joyce Cohen explains the frustrations often felt by many while eating out. Though it may seem like there is little you could do to improve your ability to hear in challenging listening environments, there are some changes you could make to help limit the effect of background noise.

1. Choose your restaurant carefully.  Modern restaurants often have high ceilings and hard cervices that often reflect noise instead of absorbing it. The more echo and reverberation present, the more difficult it is to understand speech. It is also important to choose a restaurant that has good lightening. Non-verbal cues such as lip reading, facial expressions and body language aid spoken language to help you understand others.

2. Booths are better than tables. The high backs of booths will block some of the environmental sounds that can drown out your conversation. In addition, booth seating is typically made of softer material that can absorb background noise.

3. Sit along the edges of the dining area. By sitting around the perimeter of the room you will avoid having outside noise bombard you from all directions and will allow you to focus on those you want to converse with most.

4. Sit Away from the Kitchen. Kitchens are often the noisiest places in the restaurant. Many open concept kitchens in modern restaurants give off noise pollution to the general sitting area. By choosing a place away from the kitchen, you are able to minimize it’s effect.

For more tips on how to deal with background noise and to learn more about your hearing loss contact Jacksonville Hearing and Balance Institute. Click on the link below to read Joyce Cohen’s article from the Washington Post.

WJCT Lunch & Learn Series: Identifying and Treating Vertigo

WJCT Public Media and Jacksonville Hearing & Balance Institute are hosting this free informative seminar. Learn about identifying and treating vertigo/dizziness and surgical and non-surgical treatment options.

This event will take place at WJCT studios, 100 Festival Park Avenue Jacksonville, FL 32202.

This event is FREE but seating is limited and reservations are required. Lunch will be provided. Register today by calling 904-358-6322!

Better Hearing and Speech Month

May was designated as the Better Hearing and Speech Month by the American Speech-Language-Hearing  Association (ASHA)  in 1927.  The goals of Better Hearing and Speech month is to bring awareness to hearing and speech deficits, educate the population on how these issues effect the community, and empower individuals to take action if they suspect they have a speech or hearing deficit.

Hearing loss is the third most common health issue in the United States, effecting one in every eight people over the age of 12.  Difficulty communicating with others can lead individuals to be withdrawn, negatively impacting them both socially and emotionally.  The primary goal of an audiologist, when working with these patients, is to provide the tools they need to maintain an active lifestyle and minimize the effect of their hearing loss.  The National Institute of Health (NIH) developed a short questionnaire* to see if you could benefit from having your hearing evaluated by an audiologist.

NIH QUESTIONNAIRE:

  1. Do you feel frustrated when talking to members of your family because you have difficulty hearing them?
  2. Do you have difficulty hearing or understanding co-workers, clients, or customers?
  3. Do you feel restricted or limited by a hearing problem?
  4. Do you have difficulty hearing when visiting friends, relatives, or neighbors?
  5. Do you have trouble hearing in the movies or in the theater?
  6. Does a hearing problem cause you to argue with family members?
  7. Do you have trouble hearing the TV or radio at levels that are loud enough for others?
  8. Do you feel that any difficulty with your hearing limits your personal or social life?
  9. Do you have trouble hearing family or friends when you are together in a restaurant?

If you answered “YES” to three or more of above questions, feel free to contact our clinic at (904) 339-0350 to schedule an appointment with a provider.  Together you will develop an individualized plan to improve your hearing healthcare.

*Adapted from: Newman, C.W., Weinstein, B.E., Jacobson, G.P., & Hug, G.A. (1990). The Hearing Handicap Inventory for Adults [HHIA]: Psychometric adequacy and audiometric correlates. Ear Hear, 11, 430-433.

Upcoming Hearing Aid Informational Session

Do you watch television with the volume louder than you used to? Do you have trouble understanding conversation when in a restaurant? Do you complain that people are always mumbling? These are common signs that indicate you may have a hearing loss.
• The first step is to undergo a hearing evaluation by an audiologist. If the test shows that you have a hearing loss, a hearing aid is often recommended to help make communication easier and enjoyable again.

A quick search on the internet can lead to many results regarding which hearing aid is the best. It is easy to become overwhelmed and confused by all the marketing, sales and misinformation regarding hearing aids.


Jacksonville Hearing & Balance Institute is hosting a ‘Lunch & Learn’ event to help guide you through the hearing aid selection process and to provide you with the tools you need to succeed with hearing aids.


Come join Dr. Green and Dr. Aquilina on Wednesday March 20th for an informational session regarding hearing loss and how to get the most out of your hearing aids. Register now to reserve your spot!

Cochlear & Cookies!

You are invited to come by Jacksonville Hearing and Balance Institute to discuss cochlear implant and bone-anchored hearing aid solutions for hearing loss. Cookies and coffee will be served!


Dates: February 20th and March 6th
Time: 10:30am – 1:30pm
Talk with experts about:
– Advanced implantable hearing technology
– The Cochlear™ Nucleus® and Cochlear BAHA® Systems
– Candidacy and coverage
– Assistive listening devices and more!


RSVP to Ralyn Jelus at rjelus@cochlear.com or 404-695-8612

North Florida Acoustic Neuroma Group Meeting

Please plan to join us at the next meeting of your Acoustic Neuroma Support Group.
We welcome you to learn about the latest treatment options, to network with other acoustic neuroma patients and find encouragement and support.

DATE/TIME:
Saturday, December 8th, 2018
1:00 – 3:00 p.m.

MEETING LOCATION:
UF Health North – Tower A, First Floor Lobby
15255 Max Leggett Parkway
Jacksonville, FL 32218
Phone: 904-383-1000

DIRECTIONS:
Take I95 to the Jacksonville International Airport Exit. Follow signs to Max Leggett Parkway.
Park in the parking lot closest to Tower A and enter through the main doors.

TOPICS:
● Caring, Sharing, Networking and Support

Phonak’s Newest Hearing Aid: the Audéo Marvel

Recently, Phonak unveiled of their new hearing aid called the Audéo Marvel — a device with advanced sound quality and universal Bluetooth® connectivity to both iPhone and Android devices. Available in late November, the Phonak Audéo Marvel focuses on what patients expect from a hearing aid: a clear, rich sound experience combined with modern technology. Here are some of the new features associated with this new device.

• Clear, rich sound in multiple environments, thanks to a newly developed computer chip with Artificial Intelligence.
• Connectivity to any Bluetooth® device for streaming audio content to both ears. This includes TV, music, eBooks and more.
• Hands-free calls to both ears from iPhone, Android or any other Bluetooth®-enabled devices.
• Lithium-Ion Rechargeable option available for a full day of hearing including streaming, now with the option to turn on automatically out of the charger.
• eSolutions with Smart apps enable live phone call transcriptions.

 

If you are interested in meeting with an Audiologist to learn more about this new device, and to discuss if it would be a viable option for you and your lifestyle, contact our Hearing Center at 904-900-0350 to make a consult appointment.

 

Cochlear Implant Seminar

Are your hearing aids no longer the best solution for your hearing loss?

Jacksonville Hearing and Balance Institute has teamed up with Cochlear Americas and WJCT to discuss cochlear implants with the community. Attendees will be given the opportunity to meet with members of the Jacksonville Hearing and Balance Institute and Cochlear Americas team. At the event, there will be cochlear implant devices and accessories that can be viewed and held by the public. Lunch will be provided to those that RSVP prior to November 6th.
Please see below for further details.

 

Non-Surgical Hearing Solution

One type of hearing of hearing loss is known as a conductive hearing loss. This type of hearing loss occurs when there is damage or blockage in the outer or middle ear which prevents sounds from being sent to the inner ear. Causes of conductive hearing loss can include:

– Complete wax build up
– Absence of the ear canal or a extremely narrow ear canal
– Hole in the eardrum
– Fluid behind the eardrum
– Displacement of the three tiny bones (ossicles) behind the eardrum

A bone anchored hearing aid (BAHA) is a treatment option to improve the hearing of people with conductive hearing loss . The BAHA is a surgically implanted post that works together with an external processor to bypass the outer and middle ear and deliver sound directly to the inner ear.

Recently a new processor was introduced by Med El that does not require surgery and is available at a much lower cost than the traditional BAHA. The ADHEAR processor uses an adhesive piece that sits behind the ear to send sound to the organ of hearing.


To learn if you are a candidate for the ADHEAR please contact Jacksonville Hearing & Balance Institute at 904-399-0350.