Monthly Archives: November 2016

Basic Hearing Aid Troubleshooting

Troubleshooting guide

Are you having issues with your hearing aids? Here are some common hearing aid issues, solutions, and troubleshooting steps you can take at home.

ISSUE POSSIBLE CAUSE POSSIBLE SOLUTION
HEARING AID IS DEAD OR NOT WORKING Dead, run down, or wrong type of battery. Replace battery.
Eartip plugged with wax. Change wax guard and / or dome.

Use brush to remove excess ear wax.

WORKING,

BUT IRREGULAR

Dead, run down, or wrong type of battery. Replace battery.
Battery leakage or corroded battery contacts. Discard the battery and wipe the gold terminals carefully with cloth or Q-tip to remove loose powder.
WHISTLES, CONTINUOUSLY OR OCCASIONALLY Earmold or dome is not seated properly in ear. Remove earmold and replace in ear, looking in mirror to check placement.
Earmold or dome fits loosely in ear. Make and appointment to have a new earmold made.
Tubing of earmold not connected, loose, brittle, or cracked. Bring the problem to the attention of the audiologist. The tubing may need to be replaced.
Ear wax or obstruction in canal. Schedule an appointment with the audiologist.
POOR SOUND QUALITY Change in hearing sensitivity. Schedule an appointment with the audiologist to obtain an updated hearing test.
Eartip plugged with wax. Change wax guard and / or dome. Use brush to remove excess ear wax.
Ear wax or obstruction in canal. Schedule an appointment with the audiologist.

Remember that the Hearing Center at Jacksonville Hearing and Balance Institute holds a walk-in clinic for our patients on Tuesdays (10:00 am – 11:30 am) and Thursdays (1:00 pm to 2:30 pm) to help with general hearing aid care, use, and troubleshooting. No appointment is necessary to participate in walk-in clinic.

If you’re still having issues with you hearing aids, call our clinic and make an appointment to see your hearing aid audiologist.

The Dos and Don’ts of Cleaning Your Ears

Earwax, or cerumen, is a naturally occurring substance in the ear canal that protects against bacteria, fungi, and insects. The earwax naturally migrates out of the ear canal, but can build-up over time. An excessive build-up can cause you to notice a decrease in hearing.

If you have turned on a television or opened a magazine, you have most likely seen some form of earwax removal tool being advertised. The products range from wax candles to devices that attempt to flush the wax from your ears. The most commonly used tool is, of course, the Q-tip.  It can be hard to decide when it is time to remove wax and what the safest way is to remove it.  It is important to reiterate that a little earwax is natural and constant cleaning of the ears is unnecessary. You should never stick or jab anything into the ear canal. At best, you may push the earwax deeper into your ear. At worst, you may earn yourself a trip to the doctor with a punctured eardrum.

no-qtips

Safe options for keeping your ears clean:

-Use wax removal tools around the outer ear, but never enter the ear canal

-Over-the-counter wax softeners, such as Debrox

-Visit your healthcare professional for removal.

 
If you have further questions, you can schedule an appointment at the Jacksonville Hearing and Balance Institute by calling (904) 399-0350.